influence of the synagogue upon the divine office
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influence of the synagogue upon the divine office

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Published by Oxford University Press in London .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Liturgies, Early Christian,
  • Judaism -- Liturgy,
  • Divine office,
  • Lord"s Supper (Liturgy),
  • Christianity and other religions -- Judaism,
  • Judaism -- Relations -- Christianity

Book details:

Edition Notes

Statementby C. W. Dugmore.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsBV185 .D93
The Physical Object
Paginationix, 151 p. ;
Number of Pages151
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL6465721M
LC Control Number44004554
OCLC/WorldCa9166213

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OCLC Number: Description: ix, pages 22 cm: Contents: I. The early Christian community --The break with Judaism --The development of worship services of the synagogue --Growth of the liturgy --The Shema and its blessings --The daily blessings Christian week --The Lord's Day --The Sabbath --Station days --Daily services --IV.. Growth of the Canonical hours -. Additional Physical Format: Online version: Dugmore, C.W. (Clifford William). Influence of the synagogue upon the divine office. Westminster, Faith Press []. However, the scholarly landscape has shifted enormously in the years since the publication of W. O. E. Oesterley’s The Jewish Background of the Christian Liturgy (Oxford: Clarendon Press, ) and C. W. Dugmore’s The Influence of the Synagogue Upon the Divine Office (London: Humphrey Milford, ).   Open Library is an open, editable library catalog, building towards a web page for every book ever published. The influence of the Synagogue upon the divine office by Clifford William Dugmore, , Faith Press edition, in English - New :

THE INFLUENCE OF THE SYNAGOGUE UPON THE DIVINE OFFICE* THIS compact, readable study, written by one who is thoroughly The Influence of the Synagogue upon the Divine Office. London, Oxford University Press, , pp. ix, , oct. Price 10 sh, 6d. THE JEWISH QUARTERLY REVIEW ing the book, is the way the author chose to state the problem. Intended as a replacement for The Influence of the Synagogue upon the Divine Office by C. W. Dugmore (Alcuin Club Collection No. 45), it not only incorporates the results of recent research by continental scholars and others but also challenges traditional assumptions at a number of important points, offering a fresh interpretation of the evidence. This book will appeal to a narrow audience, as Bradshaw seeks to track the origin and development of "daily prayer" in the early Christian tradition. As with all of his liturgical studies, he adopts a more critical posture than many in his field, and he refuses to accept later developments as authentic preservation of a lost era, at least /5. 6 For details see C.W. Dugmore, The Influence of the Synagogue Upon the Divine Office (Westminster ); Robert Taft, The Liturgy of the Hours in East and West: The Origins of the Divine Office and Its Meaning for Today (Second Revised Edition, The Liturgical Press-Minnesota ).

The Divine Office, Part II: Formation of the Divine Office This article is the second in a series by The Benedictine Monks of Buckfast Abbey on the Divine Office. The focus of this. Almost the only textbook on the subject which is available to English students of liturgy is The Influence of the Synagogue upon the Divine Office by Professor C. W. Dugmore, first published by the Oxford University Press in and reissued by the Alcuin Club in (Alcuin Club Collections No. 45). MARSHALL: Church and Temple in the NT Christians in Jerusalem going up to the temple at the hour of The influence of the synagogue is generally reckoned to be fundamental on the early development 8 C. W. Dugmore, The Influence of the Synagogue upon the Divine Office (Oxford ). MARSHALL: Church and Temple in the NT File Size: 58KB. In some details each office shows its independent history. It is a matter of dispute among liturgists whether Prime and Compline were added to the Roman secular office through the influence of the Benedictines (Baudot, The Roman Breviary, pp. ). The period following the death of St. Benedict in is a period of which little is known.