Land subsidence in the San Joaquin Valley, California, as of 1983
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Land subsidence in the San Joaquin Valley, California, as of 1983

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Published by U.S. Dept. of the Interior, Geological Survey, Open-File Services Section, Western Distribution Branch in Sacramento, Calif, Denver, CO .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Subsidences (Earth movements) -- California -- San Joaquin Valley,
  • Groundwater -- California -- San Joaquin Valley

Book details:

Edition Notes

Statementby R.L. Ireland ; prepared in cooperation with the California Department of Water Resources
SeriesWater-resources investigations report -- 85-4196
ContributionsCalifornia. Dept. of Water Resources, Geological Survey (U.S.)
The Physical Object
Paginationvi, 50 p. :
Number of Pages50
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL13609431M

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Land subsidence due to ground-water overdraft in the San Joaquin Valley began in the mid 's and continued at alarming rates until surface was imported through major canals and aqueducts in the 's and late 's. In areas where surface water replaced withdrawal of ground-water, water levels in the confined system rose sharply and subsidence slowed. Get this from a library! Land subsidence in the San Joaquin Valley, California, as of [R L Ireland; California. Department of Water Resources.; Geological Survey (U.S.)].   Land subsidence from overpumping groundwater in the San Joaquin Valley has been called the largest human alteration of the Earth’s surface. When the last comprehensive surveys were made in , subsidence in excess of one foot had occurred over more than 5, square miles (13, sq km) of irrigable land – half the entire valley. Since the s, excessive pumping of groundwater at thousands of wells has caused land to subside, or sink, by as much as meters (28 feet) in sections of California’s San Joaquin Valley. This subsidence is exacerbated during droughts, when farmers rely heavily on groundwater to sustain one of the most productive agricultural regions in.

Extensive groundwater withdrawal from the unconsolidated deposits in the San Joaquin Valley caused widespread aquifer-system compaction and resultant land subsidence from to —locally exceeding meters. The importation of surface water beginning in the early s through the Delta-Mendota Canal and in the early s through the California Aqueduct resulted in decreased. LAND SUBSIDENCE IN THE SAN JOAQUIN VALLEY, CALIFORNIA, AS OF By R. L. Ireland ABSTRACT Land subsidence due to ground-water withdrawal in the San Joaquin Valley that began in the mid's and reached a maximum of feet in Land subsidence along the California Aqueduct in west-central San Joaquin Valley, California, – Extensive groundwater withdrawal from the unconsolidated deposits in the San Joaquin Valley caused widespread aquifer-system compaction and resultant land subsidence from to —locally exceeding meters. Land Subsidence along the Delta-Mendota Canal in the northern part of the San Joaquin Valley, California, USGS Scientific Investigations Report Land Subsidence from Groundwater Use in California Report of Findings, Land subsidence in the San Joaquin Valley, California, USA,

Land Subsidence Studies Land Subsidence in the San Joaquin Valley. Subsidence has been a major concern in the Central Valley since the s. With agriculture and growing populations putting increased demands on the Valley's groundwater supply, subsidence must be monitored closely.   Land subsidence in California - Approximate location of maximum subsidence in the United States identified by research efforts of Dr. Joseph F. Poland (pictured). Signs on pole show approximate altitude of land surface in , , and The site is in the San Joaquin Valley southwest of Mendota, California. Additional Physical Format: Online version: Ireland, R. L. Land subsidence in the San Joaquin Valley, California, as of (OCoLC) Material Type. STUDIES OF LAND SUBSIDENCE LAND SUBSIDENCE IN THE SAN JOAQUIN VALLEY, CALIFORNIA, AS OF By J.F. POLAND, B. E. LOFGREN, R. L. IRELAND, and R. G. PUGH ABSTRACT Land subsidence which began in the mid's due to ground- water overdraft in the San Joaquin Valley has caused widespread concern for the past two decades.